HOME PAINTINGS PHOTOGRAPHS AUCTION GIFT SHOP NEWS GICLÉES ABOUT CONTACT WORKSHOPS TRADING POST SEARCH
JOHN FARNSWORTH  PAINTER / PHOTOGRAPHER
PO Box 1962 / Ranchos de Taos / New Mexico / 87557 / 505.982.4561 / info@johnfarnsworth.com

KACHINA PAINTINGS (currently available)

WAKAS (COW KACHINA)

oil on linen

48 x 72"

USD $30,000

These Kachina Watercolors are currently available:

ZUÑI  SHALAKO KACHINA
Watercolor
9 x 12 inches
$800
HÉ-É-É KACHINA
Watercolor
9 X 12 inches
$800
OWAKTSINAM
(COAL KACHINAS)
9 x 12 inches
$800
SIO CHALAKO
Acrylic on Canvas
36" x 48"
USD $8500
This  Kachina Doll is different from a Hopi Shalako in that it represents the Zuñi Shalako, from the Zuñi Pueblo in Northern New Mexico. Probably brought to Hopi by immigrants from that Pueblo during times of strife.

The Shalako Kachina is a favorite of mine, and I have painted it in many variations and in different media. Shalako is the Kachina that appears every winter in Zuñi and blesses all of the new home construction in the village. The dancers appear in pairs, and are enormous (up to twelve feet tall), and have long, snapping, clacking beaks. They are accompanied by Sipikne Kachinam representing the four directions, by Fire Kachina and by a chorus of Mudheads.

The new homes are decorated with Navajo Rugs, Pendleton Blankets, and Russian shawls. Even the mounted heads of deer are festooned in fine inlaid jewelry of silver and turquoise.

One of the most beautiful and awe inspiring of the Kachina Ceremonies I have been privileged to attend,  Shalako is no longer open to outsiders.

While they are no longer available, the following Kachina images are here for your enjoyment, and may serve as inspiration for works you might like to commission.

KACHINA STUDY PRINTS

Lakon Mana

Rooster Kachina

Mudhead Kachina

Sio Shalako Kachina 1

Velvet Shirt Kachina

Sio Shalako Kachina 2

 

 

 

KACHINA STUDY PRINTS

John made a series of very small oil pastel Kachina Studies in a spiral bound photo album. Many people, when they see the studies, want to buy them. But John refuses to part with them. When he made an enlargement of the Mudhead sketch to hang in his studio, I realized what a great collection of affordable prints the series would make.

I could see them as an exciting design accent, hanging as a group, say, along an entryway, or at the end of a hall. They would enliven the walls of a family room or a child's room or kitchen.

We considered making an expensive, limited edition, boxed set, but decided that it would be better to make a collection that could be seen and enjoyed by many more people, and that would exemplify our over-all theme of "Art you can live with".

Priced at $150 each, framed. Three for $400, or all nine for $950. Size: 12.5 x 10. Call Thea Swengel, at  505 982-4561 to order and to discuss your framing preferences.

SPECIAL OFFER:
Buy the full set and I'll throw in this Apache Mountain Spirit Mask study:

Mountain Lion Kachina

Korosto Kachina

Tihu Kachina

GHAN MASK
(Apache Mountain Spirit)

KACHINAS (sold or not available)

ZUÑI SHALAKO (Home Blesser)
Oil on linen
9” x 12”
Sold
MOONWATCHER (AWATOVI SOYOKTAKA KACHINA)
oil on linen
9 x 12 inches
Sold
ENCOUNTER
Oil on Belgian Linen on Birch Panel
10” X 14”
Sold

ZUNI SHALAKO Home Blesser
9 x 12 inches
Watercolor
Collection of Eric Weber and Jay Olson

KACHIN MANA Female Kachina
9 x 12 inches
Watercolor
Collection of Eric Weber and Jay Olson

GHAN MASK Apache Mountain Spirit Dancer
Watercolor
30 x 22 inches
AVAILABLE AT PIERSON GALLERY
1311 East 15th - Tulsa, OK 74120
piersongallery@sbcglobal.net

AHÖLA KACHINA
Oil on linen
9 x 12 inches
USD $1500
NIMAN (GOING HOME KACHINA)
30 x 24 inches
Oil on linen
USD $7200

SIP-IKNE Zuñi Warrior Kachina
24 x 30 inches
Oil on linen
USD $6400 framed

NA-UIKUITAQA Peeping Out Man Kachina
9 x 12 inches
Oil on Linen on Panel
USD $1500

SIO HEMIS (Appears in Niman Ceremony)
16 x 20 inches
Oil on linen on panel
USD $3000 framed

MASAU’U Earth God, Germ God
16 x 20 inches
Oil on Linen on panel
USD $3000 framed

TUNGWUP KACHINA Mong or Chief Kachina accompanies Crow Mother Kachina
12 x 16 inches
Oil on Linen on panel
USD $1900

HONAN Badger Kachina
8 x 10 inches
Oil on Linen on panel
USD $950 framed

WOLFIE
(KWEO, WOLF KACHINA)
Oil on Canvas
24" x 24"
USD $3200
SHALAKO BLUE
Acrylic on Canvas
25 1/2" x  24 3/4"
USD $3200
Featured in the book KATSINA by Zena Pearlstone, UCLA
Fowler Museum
SNOW MAIDEN
Watercolor
22" x 15"
USD $1800 Framed

 

I was born in Williams, Arizona and grew up in Northern Arizona, in the shadow of the Navajo and Hopi Reservations.

At the age of nine, I visited Taos, my mother’s birthplace. In the galleries of Taos, I realized that I would be an artist.

Following High School, I studied independently, and painted in my spare time while working at jobs that included managing a small private museum and Indian shop, working as a trader on the Navajo Reservation, and as Preparator at the Museum of Northern Arizona, under Kachina expert and author Barton Wright.

 

In 1967, I began camping and traveling among the Navajo and Pueblos at every opportunity; sketching, painting, and attending ceremonials

 

NIMAN
Oil on Masonite panel
48" X 48"
Sold
Collection: Terry Thomas

In 1968, I decided to devote myself to painting full-time. I continued painting Indian and Indian related subjects for the next ten years, with a year off to paint in Mexico in 1973.

Then, in 1977, I quit painting Indian subjects. I was feeling burned out; as though I’d been run over by the band-wagon of Indian-subject popularity. I also stopped attending Kachina dances because of my embarrassment over the crowding and rude, thoughtless behavior of so many non-Indians.

After a couple of years, however, the Kachinas found their way back into my consciousness. While I now paint many different subjects, ranging from animals to people, from still life to landscape, Kachinas remain an important part of my work.

Kachinas, like the Mexican Masks that I also paint, interest me not as artifacts; I've seen them painted that way, and, somehow, always felt the point has been missed. They are so much more than that. When one puts on a mask, one takes on a different identity. Becomes someone or something else. It is primarily this sense of life, of otherness, of enhanced possibilities, I believe, that attracts me. There are many other reasons, such as these from a piece I wrote for the UCLA Fowler Museum exhibition catalog KATSINA by Zena Pearlstone:

 

they are there.
they are beautiful.
they are a part of me.
they are timeless and enduring.
they are intriguing and mysterious.
they are powerful and evocative and alive.
they are carved and textured and painted and aged.
they are feathered and masked and costumed or unclothed.
they are primordial and sophisticated and speak of other worlds.
they are carriers of messages and of prayers and bringers of rain and life.
they are subtle and complex, terrifying and comforting, animal, man, spirit, cloud.
they are hope and fear, promise and admonition, deliverance and instruction, comfort and song.
they are of the earth and of the sky and of the air and of the water that flows through every thing.

 

The Kachina dolls from which my paintings are usually derived are in the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles, The Heard Museum in Phoenix, the International Folk Art Museum in Santa Fe, or the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos. Some are from private collections, including my own.

 

I am sometimes asked whether the Hopi and Zuni people are offended by my painting the Kachinas. I have never known them to be. I am not trying to replicate or imitate Kachinas. Like the many non-Indians who have written about them, I am merely reporting on them, and on their visual beauty by which I have been so moved.

 

Acrylic, oil, oil pastel, pastel, watercolor, drawing, photography, and various print forms have all been used in my Kachina works. In fact, I often depict a given Kachina in more than one medium; sometimes in several:

 

KIVA
(Koyemsim, or Mudhead Kachinas)
Oil on Masonite panel
48" X 48"
NFS

WHY KACHINAS?

I PAINT KACHINAS BECAUSE:

ART YOU CAN LIVE WITH

CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSING

 

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

This is a human-readable summary of the Legal Code (the full license).

Disclaimer

You are free to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work Under the following conditions:

Attribution
You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).

Noncommercial
You may not use this work for commercial purposes.

No Derivative Works
You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.
 

With the understanding that:

Waiver
Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder.

Public Domain
Where the work or any of its elements is in the public domain under applicable law, that status is in no way affected by the license.

Other Rights
In no way are any of the following rights affected by the license:

Your fair dealing or fair use rights, or other applicable copyright exceptions and limitations;

The author's moral rights;

Rights other persons may have either in the work itself or in how the work is used, such as publicity or privacy rights.
 

Notice — For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do this is with a link to this web page.